History of the Human Rights Campaign

In 1980, one of the most exemplary nonprofit organizations was established, the Human Rights Campaign (HRC). Their mission statement is to end discrimination against LGBTQ+ citizens and realize a nation that achieves fundamental fairness and equality for all. The HRC continues to make strides in accomplishing this mission statement by providing a strengthening system of support, employment, and advocacy to the revolution of gender identity and sexual orientation. The HRC has a well-known national presence and has been paving the way for the last 40 years.

Through the HRC Foundation, donations and contributions help to fund programs for the LGBTQ+ community for children, youth and families, which includes three main projects: All Children-All Families, the Welcoming Schools Project, and the Youth Wellbeing Project that is held by the annual Time to Thrive conference. All of these projects provide resources to those who apply for need, and serve a purpose in professional development and promote inclusion. Over the years, the HRC Foundation has expanded their programs to include: Health and Aging, HIV and Health Equity, Religion and Faith, Workplace Equality, Youth and Campus Engagement, and Global partnerships and advocacy programs and engagement groups to ensure LGBTQ+ visibility on a grander scale.

It is important to note that the HRC has always been invested and dedicated to making political changes and statements by honoring and striving to reach their goals and mission statement in monumental ways for all people. It is no coincidence that the location of the HRC building has been in the heart of Washington, DC, since 2003. The glass building is a reflection of the heart, the openness, and the resilience of the HRC to continue fighting for equity, respect and community building among human beings.

Fun Fact: Before the building belonged to the HRC, it belonged to B’nai B’rith, the oldest and largest Jewish human rights organization, and the HRC was honored to carry on the human rights tradition.

The LGBTQ+ movement continues; and the community will continue to challenge the status quo, create safe space initiatives, teach and inspire others, and embrace their #Pride.

STATUS UPDATES – WHAT THE HRC IS DOING TODAY

In the wake of the death of George Floyd, the HRC and 100+ LGBTQ Organizations released an open letter condemning racial violence (May 29, 2020).

The current HRC President, Alphonso David, launched this year’s pride month with an intersectional message, recognizing both the importance of celebrating Pride and supporting the end of racism and white supremacy to create equality for all (see video below).

The HRC has since collaborated with artist Hank Willis Thomas to transform their building with a monumental installation to honor the Black Lives Matter movement, which debuted on the celebration of Juneteenth.

Make sure to check out these tips for protesting peacefully and safely.

For more updates, visit the HRC daily blog.